Nicolas Frankel | Devoxx

Devoxx Ukraine 2018
from Friday 23 November to Saturday 24 November 2018.

Developer Advocate with 15+ years experience consulting for many different customers, in a wide range of contexts (such as telecoms, banking, insurances, large retail and public sector). Usually working on Java/Java EE and Spring technologies, but with narrower interests like Software Quality, Build Processes and Rich Internet Applications. Currently working for Exoscale. Also double as a teacher in universities and higher education schools, a trainer and triples as a book author.

See also http://blog.frankel.ch

Securing the JVM - Neither for fun nor for profit, but do you have a choice?

Conference

Consider a Java application in a private banking system. A new network administrator is hired, and while going around, he notices that the app is making network calls to a unknown external endpoint. After some investigation, it’s found that this app has been sending for years confidential data to a competitor (or a state, or hackers, whatever). This is awkward. Especially since it could have been avoided.

Code reviews are good to improve the hardening of an application, but what if the malicious code was planted purposely? Some code buried in a commit could extract code from binary content, compile it on the fly, and then execute the code in the same JVM run… By default, the JVM is not secured! Securing the JVM for a non-trivial application is complex and time-consuming but the risks of not securing it could be disastrous. In this talk, I’ll show some of the things you could do in an unsecured JVM. I’ll also explain the basics of securing it, and finally demo a working process on how to do it.

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